You are at an elevation 380 m above sea level as you start a motor ride. During the ride, elevation changes by the following metres –

Question

You are at an elevation 380 m above sea level as you start a motor ride. During the ride,
elevation changes by the following metres – 540 m, -268 m, 116 m, -152 m, 94 m. What is your
position at the end of the ride?

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Madelyn 6 days 2021-09-14T18:16:36+00:00 1 Answer 0 views 0

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    2021-09-14T18:17:36+00:00

    Answer:

    The characteristic sound of a motorcycle buzzing by is an example of the Doppler effect. Specifically, if you are standing on a street corner and observe an ambulance with a siren sounding passing at a constant speed, you notice two characteristic changes in the sound of the siren. First, the sound increases in loudness as the ambulance approaches and decreases in loudness as it moves away, which is expected. But in addition, the high-pitched siren shifts dramatically to a lower-pitched sound. As the ambulance passes, the frequency of the sound heard by a stationary observer changes from a constant high frequency to a constant lower frequency, even though the siren is producing a constant source frequency. The closer the ambulance brushes by, the more abrupt the shift. Also, the faster the ambulance moves, the greater the shift. We also hear this characteristic shift in frequency for passing cars, airplanes, and trains.

    The Doppler effect is an alteration in the observed frequency of a sound due to motion of either the source or the observer. Although less familiar, this effect is easily noticed for a stationary source and moving observer. For example, if you ride a train past a stationary warning horn, you will hear the horn’s frequency shift from high to low as you pass by. The actual change in frequency due to relative motion of source and observer is called a Doppler shift. The Doppler effect and Doppler shift are named for the Austrian physicist and mathematician Christian Johann Doppler (1803–1853), who did experiments with both moving sources and moving observers. Doppler, for example, had musicians play on a moving open train car and also play standing next to the train tracks as a train passed by. Their music was observed both on and off the train, and changes in frequency were measured.

    What causes the Doppler shift? (Figure) illustrates sound waves emitted by stationary and moving sources in a stationary air mass. Each disturbance spreads out spherically from the point at which the sound is emitted. If the source is stationary, then all of the spheres representing the air compressions in the sound wave are centered on the same point, and the stationary observers on either side hear the same wavelength and frequency as emitted by the source (case a). If the source is moving, the situation is different. Each compression of the air moves out in a sphere from the point at which it was emitted, but the point of emission moves. This moving emission point causes the air compressions to be closer together on one side and farther apart on the other. Thus, the wavelength is shorter in the direction the source is moving (on the right in case b), and longer in the opposite direction (on the left in case b). Finally, if the observers move, as in case (c), the frequency at which they receive the compressions changes. The observer moving toward the source receives them at a higher frequency, and the person moving away from the source receives them at a lower frequency.

    Picture A is a drawing of a parked car that is a source of sound-waves and two non-moving people who act as observers. Picture A is a drawing of a moving car that is a source of sound-waves and two non-moving people who act as observers. Picture C is a drawing of a moving car that is a source of sound-waves and two moving people who act as observers.

    Step-by-step explanation:

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18:9+8+9*3-7:3-1*13 = ? ( )